Patrick Tuohey
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The Robin Hood of legend was renowned for robbing from the rich to give to the poor. Liberals have heralded the story as an example of social justice and ethical redistribution. Conservatives see him as a hero of the trodden-upon taxpayer, cruelly set upon by wealthy and entitled elites. It is perhaps because of this dual view that the legend has survived so long.

Officials in Kansas City crafted a bizarro Robin Hood streetcar taxing plan that takes from the poor to give to the rich.

The city has created a Transportation Development District (TDD) encompassing much of the city in order to fund a significant portion of the rail line. The TDD will levy a "special assessment" on homes, businesses, and charities within a one-third mile of the proposed tracks and a 1 percent sales tax everywhere in the district.

While we have argued that claims that streetcars cause business development are completely unproven, streetcar supporters counter that there is some evidence that the project will increase property values along the route. And indeed there is some evidence that property values will increase, especially if the city pours money into the corridor, as NextRail KC officials hope. But while values may go up, property and sales taxes are guaranteed to increase as well. Even then, those increases in value primarily benefit the property owner when selling the property. (If you rent your home or apartment, your rent will go up but you won't benefit from any property value increase.)

In other words, some of the poorest parts of Kansas City — those already in dire need of transportation and infrastructure improvements — will be paying more in taxes so that the already developed parts of Kansas City can get new sidewalks, landscaping, streetcars, and the increased property values that go with it. Those outside the TDD will also pay more through sales tax and the special assessment levied on government property, and by however the city decides to close the $30 million to $50 million gap in financing.

Seriously, that is Kansas City Mayor Sly James' plan.

To make matters worse, non-profit organizations along the route will pay a special assessment that will impact their ability to serve those same communities in need. Not only is the city throwing the east side into the deep end of the pool, they're pulling up all the ladders. That is why Fr. Ernie Davis, pastor at both St. Therese Little Flower and St. James, wrote a letter to his colleagues at other churches (emphasis added):
But most frightening is the proposal to assess churches, schools and charities within the corridor. That will literally take bread out of the children's mouths and books out of students' hands in order to fund a streetcar.... I hope you will study the issue and to the extent that you are able, lend your support to efforts that would derail the streetcar until there is a different funding formula that would not impose such a heavy burden on those who are least able to afford it.

Here at the Show-Me Institute, we are not totally opposed to some types of charities making property tax payments. But we have never included churches in that, and our argument has always been focused on true public needs, not pricey public toys such as a streetcar.

The Kansas City streetcar robs from those who don't have to give to those who don't need, or even want.

About the Author

Patrick Tuohey
Patrick Tuohey
Director of Municipal Policy

Patrick Tuohey is the Director of Municipal Policy at the Show-Me Institute.